Youth Target Market

Thousands of young people run away from their homes, are asked to leave their homes, or become homeless in the United States each year. Since 1975, the U.S. government has funded emergency shelter programs for runaway and homeless youth to provide for their immediate needs and promote family reunification. Unfortunately, many homeless young people can’t go home.

In response to growing concern for youth in need of long-term, supportive assistance that emergency shelter programs were not designed to provide, Congress created the Transitional Living Program for Older Homeless Youth as part of the 1988 Amendments to the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974. The Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) funded the first transitional living programs in 1990.

FYSB mission is to support the organizations and communities that work every day to put an end to youth homelessness, adolescent pregnancy and domestic violence. The Rising youth Center hope to be one of those organization addressing youth homelessness.

FYSB mission is to support the organizations and communities that work every day to put an end to youth homelessness, adolescent pregnancy and domestic violence. The Rising youth Center hope to be one of those organization addressing youth homelessness.

As middle school students transition from elementary school to high school, they face many challenges. Some will desire structure while others are ready for independence. No matter where the student is developmentally though, it’s important to keep them on the right path with caring adults and opportunities for engagement outside of school. There are many risk factors that build on each other over time through the individual, family, school and community environments. As students gain more personal freedom and course work becomes more intellectually demanding, teachers also seem less supportive, peer groups become larger and relationships become more complicated. Youth are also faced with early adult responsibilities, new relationships and physical changes. Some youth aren’t ready for these changes and feel helpless and those who are ready want to handle greater responsibilities, but society won’t let them. While experiencing these changes youth may feel a wide range of emotions and not know how to deal with them. Changes such as family problems including divorce and marital instability, a significant loss of a loved one or friend, pressure to succeed, poor self-esteem, social isolation due to appearance or sexual orientation and new responsibilities may lead to suicide among youth. This critical time period in which youth need caring adults who can offer guidance and help young people thrive can be miss to the youth detriment if there is no institution available to offer a healthy alternative.

The Center wants to provide a safe environment for youth that’s structured but also helps youth explore their autonomy and exercise choices. In order to provide youth with this kind of support, the rising youth Center will engage students through specifics activities after school as well as outdoor activities.

We know that individuals develop bonds to a group when there are opportunities for involvement, they possess the skills needed for involvement, and receive positive feedback. Through this bond, youth will be engaged in those activities which will result in positive behavior. Although college students are more independent and are usually busy working and attending school, they too, have few options for healthy, fun events. The Center will have a “College Night” once a week to help them apply for internships and attend trainings to help further their careers. Through the safe environment that we create, youth will gain valuable skills, friendships, and develop a sense of purpose during this difficult transition in their lives.